writers’ groups


Is this thing on? Anyone still here?

Well —

I got to preview Holly Lisle’s How to Revise Your Novel, and the first lesson is pretty good! I dug out the original copy of Freedom that I got bound in that offer Lulu.com gave back during NaNo 2005 to use for my revision. That book has given me more fits than any other one I’ve written, so I figured it’s a good test run as to whether this class is any good. 😉

If you want to be in the first class in January 2010, just go to the link above and sign up to be on the announcement list for when enrollment starts.

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Holly Lisle hasn’t announced it yet (I got a note from her affiliate manager), but she’s closing the How to Think Sideways novel-writing class to new members on October 9th, so she can work on some other projects. She plans to open the class to new members twice a year; the next time will be sometime in 2010.

So if you’ve been thinking about taking the class this is the time to join.

Right now, I’m on lesson 14 (yeah, I’m behind, but it’s okay, since you just pay for the lessons and they’re available for as long as you like), and wow. That’s all I can say about it.

It sort of goes like this: you ever write, going along great, and something weird pops up? That’s your subconscious putting a hint of something about your story that – if you want – might make your story REALLY good. Holly shows you how to use that.

(which of course means I’m now going back through all my stories to put this into practice!)

So go at least take a look.

I just started lesson five on the How to Think Sideways class (lesson six is up but I’ve been slow). This lesson … mind-blowing. If you can imagine tapping into your subconscious for all the things that motivate you, then putting THAT into your writing on a conscious level … it’s incredible.

I have two great ideas for stories from lesson 4, but I’m going with the SF one (any surprise?) because I can do a better job on this without a ton of research — I’ll need some (know someone who curses in Chinese?) but it’s set in Los Angeles and that’s a place I already know.

Click the box at the top of the sidebar on the right there for more information on the course, or you’re welcome to ask about it. I’ve gotten my money’s worth already and I still have the rest of the year to go.

Right now I’m taking Holly Lisle’s How to Think Sideways class (the 12 month edition, which I recommend if you’re coming off a slump, have a lot of outside work going on, or are in general a busy person, as it’s the same lessons, only once every two weeks instead of once a week), and it has been just what I needed.

The first lesson is deceptively simple: what are four barriers (she says THE four barriers) to success?

At first I thought this was one of those first class ‘gimme’ lessons, but when I really took a look and did the work on it, boy, it kicked my butt.

The thing I like best about this class is that you’re assigned to a workgroup. We’re having some very thought-provoking discussions that are changing the way I look at life in general and writing in particular.

And the second class homework is one of those assignments that is so outright FUN that I look forward to working on the project more. (Yeah, it’s a project, already!) I’m getting excited about writing again.

Anyway, if it sounds interesting go by and check it out here. You can start the series at any time, she just assigns the workgroups as a bunch of people join up.

I’ve talked about Holly Lisle’s “How to Think Sideways” course before, but since she’s closing the Charter Member category (and I’m to the point where I could benefit from some input), I decided to join up. She has 6 month and 12 month courses (the only difference is that you get one lesson a week or one every other week, which is the one I picked), and just looking at the first lesson I made a good choice.

If you want more information about the course or how to sign up, go here.

I haven’t put in a plug for my deviantART community, Fifty Word Fiction, in a while, but if you have any interest in microfiction, stop by. Mostly what it is involves getting people to write very short stories, which the ‘deviations’ link to. Some people use the site for prompts as well, for longer works.

Hope to see you over there! Joining deviantART is free (but you can read without joining, too).

2240 words

Had to research our local stars, and the characteristics of peccaries, but otherwise it was a good writing jag.

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